Jana Grill & Bakery 

khash is available for a minimum of 1,500 drams (or about $5) in Gyumri’s taverns. In some restaurants in Yerevan khash is served for up to 5,000 drams (about $16) a portion. Unlike other kinds of Armenian meals khash is served only with limited ingredients, such as garlic, salt, mineral water, greens, radishes, yellow chili peppers, lavash, and vodka, which makes it possible to digest the “feet soup”. (Source)

 

Khash is served with salt on the side, garlic sauce (fresh garlic infused in the khash broth), dry lavash which is crushed in the broth and fresh lavash.Traditionally lavash is consumed with hands.

Traditionally khash is served in the morning between 7-10 a.m. Centuries ago, when rich people slaughtered animals, they used only meat and threw away the feet (as well as tails and entrails) and it is believed that poor people picked them up, cooked and ate them early in the morning so that nobody could see what 

they were eating. But it is enough to have khash only once to realize that it is better to eatkhash in the morning anyway, because it is difficult to digest. Some people abstain from eating from the previous evening. 

Khash is no longer considered to be a meal for the poor, especially now that a portion of

HISTORY

Khash is an ancient dish which roots can be found in medieval Armenian texts dating back to the 12th century. 

The preparation process is a day long. The hooves must be carefully plucked of any stray hairs and afterwards soaked in water for a day to remove impurities and funky odors. The cooking is an eight-hour simmer requiring hourly check-ins. The bovine shanks must boil until the tendon falls off the bones and the water becomes a thick broth. Many times cooked stomach pieces are also added to the dish. 

Traditionally khash is served in the morning between 7-10 a.m. Centuries ago, when rich people slaughtered animals, they used only meat and threw away the feet (as well as tails and entrails) and it is believed that poor people picked them up, cooked and ate them early in the morning so that nobody could see what 

they were eating. But it is enough to have khash only once to realize that it is better to eatkhash in the morning anyway, because it is difficult to digest. Some people abstain from eating from the previous evening. 

Khash is no longer considered to be a meal for the poor, especially now that a portion of

khash is available for a minimum of 1,500 drams (or about $5) in Gyumri’s taverns. In some restaurants in Yerevan khash is served for up to 5,000 drams (about $16) a portion. Unlike other kinds of Armenian meals khash is served only with limited ingredients, such as garlic, salt, mineral water, greens, radishes, yellow chili peppers, lavash, and vodka, which makes it possible to digest the “feet soup”. (Source)

 

Khash is served with salt on the side, garlic sauce (fresh garlic infused in the khash broth), dry lavash which is crushed in the broth and fresh lavash.Traditionally lavash is consumed with hands.

KHASH

MENU and INSTRUCTIONS

 

KHASH

Overnight slow cooked beef hooves broth served in a large bowl

SALT

Khash is cooked without salt. Adding salt to taste is the first step of the ritual.

GARLIC SAUCE

Garlic infused Khash broth is served on the side and it's the second step. Add the sauce to taste. 

DRY LAVASH  (At Jana, it's baked at Jana)

Dry lavash is to be crumbled into the broth until the soup becomes spongy.

 

FRESH LAVASH 

The final step is covering the bowl with fresh lavash. Generally khash eaters don’t eat this soup with a spoon. Instead, the fresh lavash is used to eat the dish with hands. (If confused ask our staff for demonstration.)

APPETIZERS 

House Made Pickles  - for opening appetite

Radishes and Greens - to help with digestion

Panir/Cheese Plate (optional)  

DRINKS

Sparkling Water (Jermuk) - to help with digestion

HISTORY

Khash is an ancient dish which roots can be found in medieval Armenian texts dating back to the 12th century. 

The preparation process is a day long. The hooves must be carefully plucked of any stray hairs and afterwards soaked in water for a day to remove impurities and funky odors. The cooking is an eight-hour simmer requiring hourly check-ins. The bovine shanks must boil until the tendon falls off the bones and the water becomes a thick broth. 

Traditionally khash is served in the morning between 7-10 a.m. Centuries ago, when rich people slaughtered animals, they used only meat and threw away the feet (as well as tails and entrails) and it is believed that poor picked them up, cooked and ate early in the morning so that nobody could see what they were eating. 

But it is enough to have khash only once torealize that it is better to eatkhash in the morning anyway, because it is difficult to digest. Some people abstain from eating from the previous evening. Khash is no longer considered to be a meal for the poor, especially now that a portion of khash is available for a minimum of 1,500 drams (or about $5) in Gyumri’s taverns. In some restaurants in Yerevan khash is served for up to 5,000 drams (about $16) a portion. Unlike other kinds of Armenian meals khash is served only with limited ingredients, such as garlic, salt, mineral water, greens, radishes, yellow chili peppers, lavash, and vodka, which makes it possible to digest the “feet soup”. (Source)

 

Khash is served with salt on the side, garlic sauce (fresh garlic infused in the khash broth), dry lavash which is crushed in the broth and fresh lavash.Traditionally lavash is consumed with hands.